Tessuti Free Sewing Pattern –

I downloaded the free Tessuti knit top, this was my first downloaded pattern. And, a perfect choice too. The knit blouse/tunic pattern was easy to sew and I now know why all the raves for this top. I love it and can image myself making this in several versions. The only thing I added was about 3 inches to the sleeves. It sewed up very fast. I had enough fabric left over to make a knit skirt as well. The fabric came from JoAnn’s.  I want to get the Tessuti dress pattern as well. The download/sewing pattern had 15 pages and came with no directions, so if you are new to sewing or downloads you might need a bit of help but it seems pretty self-explanatory. I may just be a convert to download/patterns yet.  Here are some photos of my rendition. Continue reading

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Vogue 7405 (OOP) Completed

Vogue OOP 7405

Vogue OOP 7405

However, this being my first wrap dress I’m not totally convinced these are the universal dress every fashion editor makes them out to be. This one is extremely hugging at every bump and curve.  It tends to droop, so I’m constantly futzing with it.  I tied it rather tight at work and it felt a bit restraining.   The fabric was very soft and it did feel like wearing pajamas which isn’t a bad thing. I don’t know I’ll need to wear it a few times to see if I want to make another one or maybe try a different knit that isn’t so  body conscious.  Do you like wrap dresses? Any suggestions?  See more of the pattern review and alterations.  Continue reading

Updating the wardrobe

Ya, I’ve been away for awhile.  I miss blogging.  I finally got a little free time and decided to update my wardrobe and whip off a little blog post to get back into the swing of things.  Maybe reading Advanced Style got me fired up.  Looking at all those grandma’s rockin’ their style made me look at my own wardrobe and how I can spice it up.  I am in a deep frumpy rut and need a forklift to get me out.   I love the A-line and have made many.   But, it’s all looking a little too dowdy.  Here is a before and after. What do you think?

IMG_3291

Before

After

After

All I did was take up the hem and taper it more at the hip to hem.  Do you have any  ideas for de-frumping the wardrobe?

Vintage Button Show

IMG_3676I had no idea there was this was going on; button collecting!  The Colorado State Button Society puts on a button show every year.  There are juried competitions and of course dealers and collectors go to buy. There are classes, lectures and workshops too. And, oh all the buttons. Beautiful buttons, everywhere.  Old ones,very old ones, Bake-lite, glass, buttons from Germany, China, Egypt.  The most expensive I saw was almost 2000.00.  The cheapest was a quarter.  That’s the bin I was in. Continue reading

Search for better marking tools

Image from Sew True.com

Image from Sew True.com

It’s getting increasingly difficult to see my marks for darts and so forth. (I think the cause of my failing eyesight is this hideous grey font every web designer is so hot for.)   I found this product at the local fabric shop.  Mark-B-Gone is a fabric type paper similar to the  carbon or chalk papers but much thicker.   I used it on a dark linen.  The lines were fairly visible and came off easily on my swatch.  I did mark each side individually for better results.  Have you used this product?  If there is a white paper it would be even better on darker fabrics.  Is anyone finding the chalk paper harder to come by?

Do you have a favorite marking product that might be helpful for the visually impaired?  

MACKLEMORE and RYAN LEWIS – THRIFT SHOP – (Not the clean version)

Super Thrifter

Super Thrifter

I made a run to the local thrift shop and thought this vid pretty well summed it up.  

Probably should of washed this…..

Easy couture technique for waistbands – yes, easy!

New pencil skirt

New pencil skirt

Since I make a lot of  skirts I’ve decided to up the ante and start adding in couture techniques or different elements to keep my skills moving forward. On this pencil skirt from Burda 8155 I used a couture waistband technique from Susan Khalje which is featured in the latest issue of Threads magazine (March 2013). The short of it is to place petersham or grosgrain and sandwich in between the fabric and lining of the waistband.  It offers much more stability in the waist area.  

For the pertersham cut out the same length as your waistband pattern piece, which is usually your waist measurement plus 4 inches. Install the lining if there is one.  Next place the petersham on the right side of fabric, above the skirt’s waistband stitching line.  Here is where I added a step. Continue reading